Landmark Union Votes Prompt University’s Sudden Commitment to Improving Faculty Working Conditions

On the heels of landmark faculty unionization victories at the International Academy and Roski, and facing a new union election in Dornsife, where administrators repeatedly broke federal labor laws to discourage faculty unionization, Provost Quick announced the approval of an Academic Senate resolution regarding faculty salaries.

The University’s sudden commitment to improving faculty working conditions shows the power we have when we stand up together.

For months, we’ve been unrelenting in our push to raise standards for ourselves and the students we teach. Earlier this year, faculty in Dornsife, Roski, and the International Academy took a brave step in the right direction by filing for union elections in their schools.

Our unprecedented on-campus organizing efforts changed the conversation around faculty working conditions at USC. Make no mistake, the administration’s newfound dedication to raising standards for NTT faculty is a direct result of our fight for a real seat at the table. Today more than ever, we must stay committed to securing a lasting voice that will determine our pay, benefits, and terms of our employment.

“The administration’s recent commitment to address our concerns is an unbridled attempt to stifle the power that we, as a group, actually possess. This is a unique opportunity for us to stand together as professionals in order to continue working in a collegial and respectful environment here at USC. That’s why I support our efforts to unionize.” 

Andrea Parra, Dornsife College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences

As we’ve seen, the University can make unilateral changes to our employment at any time, without our input. Absent a mechanism for real accountability, major decisions about our working conditions remain in the hands of a select few, and can be changed on a whim.

In just the last year, the University has dismantled our transportation subsidy and taken away the vision coverage provided in our health plans. Not only do these actions completely ignore the needs of our faculty, we weren’t even part of the decision making process.

But together in a union, our collective voice can drive substantial, long-term improvements that benefit everyone in our educational community. We can ensure the needs of faculty and students are a priority, not an afterthought.

For months, we have stood together to call for real improvements, and our power has forced the University to take notice. Now more than ever, it’s critical that we build on our victories and move forward in our fight to raise professional standards at USC.

We’re winning, and we’re not stopping. Click here to sign an authorization card and join us in building a strong faculty union at USC.

Nathaniel Heneghan

Lecturer

East Asian Languages and Cultures

Dornsife College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences

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